Former Naval Shipyard Hunters Point

Timely Topics

The Navy has developed the following list of relevant and timely topics about its cleanup program at the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS). We hope that members of the community and media representatives will find this tool useful to better understand environmental cleanup efforts at the Shipyard.

Topics are in chronological order and introduced with a question, or a brief description of an issue which is followed by a statement from Mr. Derek Robinson, Environmental Coordinator for HPNS.

Please make this page your first stop when looking for the most current content available about HPNS.

If you don't find the information you need, please send an email to derek.j.robinson1@navy.mil

August 7, 2020
Navy Releases Survey Results on Community Outreach

Statement: The Navy’s outreach program for the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS) cleanup program provides the local community with a variety of options for residents to receive information and provide feedback. The outreach program includes in-person meetings, regular updates and access to documents via email, postal mail and the HPNS website, and a telephone line that provides information about Navy HPNS outreach activities in English, Spanish and Cantonese.

While the Navy’s HPNS outreach program has expanded and continued to reach more community members, the Navy re-evaluates the outreach program every two years. As part of this effort, the Navy conducts a survey to solicit feedback on the Navy’s public engagement and communications related to HPNS.

From December 2019 through January 2020, the Navy conducted its latest survey to solicit community feedback on the Navy’s outreach program and residents’ preferences for receiving information on the HPNS cleanup. The Navy sent the survey to 15,350 addresses in the three zip codes defined as the Hunters Point/Bayview community. This included all homes and businesses within one-quarter mile of the Shipyard, and businesses located on the former Navy base.

Based on the response from the survey, residents did not indicate a desire to change the HPNS community outreach program. In the latest survey, respondents ranked their preferred information source as follows: (1) email, (2) website, (3) fliers/fact sheets, (4) newsletters and (5) attending meetings. This is consistent with findings from Navy HPNS community surveys conducted in 2016 and 2017. More detailed information about the survey can be found in our Q1-Q2 Quarterly Progress Update.

The survey was just one of several sources of information the Navy considered as it reviewed the HPNS Restoration Advisory Board status. The Navy also evaluated data from community events, including comments received during public meetings and other presentations, and attendance and public interest in meetings.

The Navy will continue with the current outreach approach to share information about the HPNS cleanup through the engagements mentioned above. This approach provides ongoing opportunities for feedback from and engagement with the community, ensuring that the public is apprised of regular updates on the cleanup efforts at HPNS.

The Navy has adjusted its outreach program due to the COVID-19 pandemic and shelter-in-place requirements. Navy staff hosted virtual meetings on April 24 and July 23 to update the community on HPNS and answer questions, and also gave a presentation and took questions on June 22 to the Hunters Point Shipyard Citizens Advisory Committee. The Navy plans to continue the virtual meetings program given the State of California’s continued social distancing efforts.

An HPNS Community Involvement fact sheet will be provided in the summer of 2020 with information obtained from this recent review. The Navy commits to continued evaluation of the outreach program for effective communication to the community.

Feedback and questions from the community are always welcome.

For information and updates or to provide feedback:

  • Call the HPNS Info Line at (415) 295-4742
  • Send an email to info@sfhpns.com
     

 

July 6, 2020 (updated 8-5-20)
Navy Establishes Soil Background Levels for HPNS Cleanup, Set to Begin Parcel G Retesting

8-5-20 update: In agreement with regulatory agencies and following the recent establishment of background of radiological materials, the Navy will start to mobilize for retesting work at Parcel G on August 10, 2020. Retesting fieldwork for Parcel G will begin in late August or early September and is expected to continue through early 2021. Samples taken during Parcel G retesting and results from tests on other parcels will be compared against background levels to help provide confidence in the current site conditions and assist with cleanup efforts for future transfer of the property.

Statement: Based on federal cleanup requirements, the Navy has determined the “background” – or baseline – of radiological materials that are present in the soil at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS). Future soil testing results will be compared against these background levels to help complete environmental cleanup work at the Shipyard starting with Parcel G.

Background levels for HPNS were established in collaboration with regulatory agencies and provide an essential understanding of the differences between natural and man-made materials that may be present in soil. The Navy will use this information and other relevant data to make sound cleanup decisions that ensure public health and safety. More information can be found in the fact sheet Background Levels Explained.

The Navy conducted a thorough, science-based study to establish background levels.

  • The work plans for the study were reviewed and approved by regulatory agencies.
  • In November 2019, the Navy completed collection of more than 250 background soil samples for six radionuclides of concern: cesium, plutonium, radium, strontium, thorium and uranium. Regulatory agency representatives and the Navy’s quality assurance team monitored the sampling activities.
  • An independent state-approved laboratory then analyzed the soil samples.
  • The Navy drafted a report summarizing the background study, submitted it to regulatory agencies and recently finalized it after addressing agency comments. The final-background study is available here.


The retesting efforts will help to ensure confidence in the current site conditions and assist with cleanup efforts for future transfer of the property.

Retesting will include scanning, collecting, and analyzing more than 6,900 soil samples. The soil samples will be compared to the established background levels to determine whether the measurements fall within certain thresholds of risk that are protective of human health and the environment. If site-related contamination is found, the soil will be excavated, properly managed, and disposed at a licensed off-site facility.

After testing is completed, the Navy will provide a radiological evaluation to regulatory agencies for review and determine any necessary steps for remedial action.

The retesting work will include multiple layers of Navy and regulatory agency oversight, on-site fieldwork monitoring conducted by the Navy Resident Officer in Charge of Construction, and an independent third-party contractor to provide for quality assurance checks on radiological fieldwork.

Measures to Protect the Community

The Navy has several procedures in place at HPNS for the protection of the surrounding community during cleanup activities, including dust control measures such as watering during construction activities, maintenance of soil stockpiles, durable covers, and air monitoring. This also includes truck management activities such as covering and tire washing before soil and debris are hauled off-site.

The Navy collects data on dust and chemicals in the air to ensure these measures are working adequately. More information can be found in this fact sheet on dust control and truck management, including the route that construction-related trucks will take when exiting HPNS.

The retesting work will continue through the Winter of 2020.  

The Navy will continue to keep the community updated on the Parcel G retesting process.

If you have any questions, please contact the Navy's Environmental Coordinator, Derek Robinson (derek.j.robinson1@navy.mil).

 

March 16, 2020
Public Meeting Suspension

Statement: Until further notice, the Navy Base Realignment and Closure Program Office will suspend hosting all public meetings as a safety precaution due to the COVID-19 virus. We want to protect the communities who work with us, our staff, and the greater community. Please continue to check our website for new information about Navy-site environmental cleanup efforts in your community. If you have any questions please, call Mr. Derek Robinson at 619-524-6026 or email him at derek.j.robinson1@navy.mil.

 

January 30, 2020
Updates Presented to the Citizen Advisory Committee

Statement: On 27 January, Navy staff updated the Bayview-Hunters Point Citizen Advisory Committee (CAC) about the cleanup program at the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS).

Summary of the updates:

  • Radiological Retesting. Late 2019, the Navy completed fieldwork to collect background soil samples, a key step to retest Parcel G at Hunters Point. Regulatory agency representatives and the Navy’s quality assurance team monitored the soil-sampling fieldwork, which took place at four HPNS locations and one off-site location. Following analysis and validation of soil samples at a state-approved independent laboratory, the Navy will share results with regulatory agencies and the public this spring.

  • Parcel E Fieldwork. The Navy also detailed the phased approach to remedial action already underway at Parcel E, an area located in the southwestern portion of HPNS. Primary activities include removing contaminated soil and sediment, conducting radiological surveys, protecting the shoreline from erosion–all designed to protect public health. Fact sheets with additional information on Parcel E fieldwork are available on the HPNS Document’s webpage.

The presentation is available on the HPNS Meeting Material’s webpage.

The Navy has continued to update the community on its cleanup efforts, and it is in the process of completing a survey of 15,000 Hunters Point/Bayview residents about how they prefer to receive information about the Navy’s cleanup work at the Shipyard.

 

December 4, 2019 
Community Update On Hunters Point Naval Shipyard Cleanup

Statement: The Navy is committed to updating the public and ensuring it has confidence in the environmental cleanup program at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS) by sharing informational updates.

Here’s a summary of the Navy’s latest cleanup and outreach progress at HPNS:

Published Five-Year Review Report. On July 31, the Navy finalized its fourth Five-Year Review report on the Shipyard. The report evaluated if the current and planned remedies at the site are, or will be at their completion, protective of human health and the environment. The Five-Year Review report is available for viewing/download at the following link: Final Report.

Completed Background Soil Sampling. The Navy has completed a key step in its work to retest Parcel G. Background sampling fieldwork was completed at four locations on HPNS and one location off site (a local park) during August and September 2019. More than 250 soil samples were collected. Regulatory agency representatives and the Navy’s quality assurance team monitored the sampling fieldwork. Following analysis and validation at a state-approved independent laboratory, the Navy will share results with regulatory agencies and the public. The Final Background Sample Report is scheduled for completion in the Spring of 2020.

Hosted Bus Tour. On August 17, the Navy hosted a guided bus tour of HPNS, offering the public a first-hand look at cleanup projects underway at Hunters Point. The Navy hosts tours like these throughout the year. Email info@sfhpns.com for more information on upcoming tours.

Briefed Citizens Advisory Committee. The Navy joined the Hunters Point Shipyard Citizens Advisory Committee (HPS CAC) on August 26 and updated the community on the progress at HPNS. In its presentation to the committee, the Navy discussed the work plan it released in June to retest Parcel G, the start of fieldwork for background soil sampling, and the latest Five-Year Review report. The presentation and materials shared by the Navy at the meeting are available on the Meeting Material webpage. The next HPS CAC meeting will be on January 27, 2020.

Provided Access to Radiological Expert. Dr. Kathryn Higley, an internationally recognized radiological health and safety expert from Oregon State University that serves as an independent resource to the public, was available to meet with community members and answer questions in person in August, September and October. If you were unable to meet with her, she welcomes your questions by phone (541) 737-0675, email (Kathryn.Higley@oregonstate.edu) or by appointment.

Participated in Community Local Events. Navy cleanup program representatives participated in the Visitacion Valley Greenway Celebration on August 17, and the Shipyard Artists Open Studios on October 13. Program materials about the HPNS cleanup were available in multiple languages to meet the needs of various community groups.

Produced Videos, Fact Sheets to Explain Cleanup. This fall, the Navy made three videos available to the public to explain various aspects of the cleanup program at the former shipyard. Video topics included Radiological Health and Safety, Historical Radiological Assessment (HRA), and Radiological Retesting at Parcel G. In addition, fact sheets describing Durable Covers, the HRA, Parcel E Fieldwork, and Dust Control were published. The videos are available on the Radiological Cleanup webpage and the fact sheets are available on the Documents webpage.

For more information on the Hunters Point cleanup call the HPNS Info Line at (415) 295-4742 or send an email to info@sfhpns.com.

 

November 26, 2019 
Response to questions about EPA comment letter (Nov. 15, 2019) on the Evaluation of Radiological Remedial Goals for Soil at HPNS

Statement: The Navy continues to work with EPA and other regulatory stakeholders to ensure that cleanup efforts at former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard are protective. EPA recently concurred on the protectiveness determinations in the Navy’s Five-Year Review. The soil evaluation is part of the Navy’s efforts to evaluate past radiological remediation and/or future radiological retesting. In the soil evaluation, the Navy estimated the maximum radiation dose and the risk to residents from exposures to potentially contaminated Hunters Point soils using both its preferred method (RESRAD) and EPA’s PRG calculator. As stated in an August 8 Timely Topics post, the remedial goals for soil are protective and consistent with federal law (CERCLA). The Navy agrees with EPA that collecting data and evaluating risk is the way to ensure long-term protectiveness. As recommended in the EPA letter, the Navy will verify risk levels using actual data collected in the field during soil retesting. The Navy’s cleanup of Hunters Point is guided by strict federal standards to ensure all cleanup goals will protect public health over the long term. The Navy is confident it will achieve that goal.  

The Five-Year Review and soil remedial goal evaluation are relevant to areas where the Navy addressed radiological contamination in the past and/or are planning on retesting. Parcel A is not affected by these actions.

 

October 30, 2019 
How Does the Navy Keep the Community Informed About the Cleanup Program at Hunters Point? 

Statement: The Navy is committed to keeping the greater Hunters Point community informed about cleanup program progress at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS). The ultimate goal is to ensure confidence in the safety of the Shipyard property upon transfer to the City of San Francisco.

There are two primary methods the Navy uses to keep the community informed:

1.  Electronic and Hardcopy (website, videos and fact sheets, mailings and information repository)

2.  Direct Outreach (meetings, public notices, surveys and email)

Electronic and Hardcopy:

Navy website. The Navy’s HPNS website is updated regularly with news, public notices, frequently asked questions, meeting materials and presentations, program documents, and informational fact sheets. The latest news and information is typically shared on the Timely Topics page and/or in the What’s New section of the homepage. These posts include a community newsletter that recaps recent developments of note.

Quarterly and annual updates. The Navy publishes quarterly and annual updates of HPNS cleanup achievements. These documents are sent to members of the HPNS distribution lists and are posted on the Progress Reports page of the website.

Radiological program videos and fact sheets. The HPNS website includes a series of videos and topic-specific fact sheets that explain the process and technical elements of the ongoing radiological retesting at the former Shipyard.

Distribution lists. The Navy provides information to more than 2,000 community members via email, offering regular program updates, project spotlights, public notices, meeting announcements, bus tour registration and program contact information. Program materials are sent via email and/or U.S. Mail to more than 50 local community groups and organizations. The Navy also provides technical fact sheets to a distribution list of 2,000 postal addresses and notices for public meetings and surveys to a mailing list with more than 15,000 postal addresses. To be added to an HPNS distribution list, send an email or leave a message on the HPNS Info Line at (415) 295-4742.

Information repositories. The Navy’s materials are available to the public at two established information repositories: the Bayview/Linda Burton-Brooks Branch Library (5075 3rd Street, (415) 355-5757) and at the main San Francisco Public Library, Government Information Center, 5th Floor (100 Larkin Street, (415) 557-4400). Due to space considerations, the local branch library has a limited selection of program documents; however, the main library has an extensive selection.

Administrative Record. An online Administrative Record (AR) file has been established by the Navy for the environmental cleanup program at HPNS, which is available for public review. It includes technical reports, project documents and other supporting documentation that form the basis for selection of remedial actions under the environmental cleanup program at HPNS. A search tool is provided on the Navy’s website.

Direct Outreach:

Public and community meetings. The Navy gives presentations at regularly scheduled Hunters Point Shipyard Citizens Advisory Committee (HPS CAC) Environmental and Reuse (E&R) Subcommittee Meetings. In addition, the Navy holds its own public meetings at key milestones in the federal regulatory process that require community stakeholder input. This includes one-on-one and small group discussions about topics of interest with subject-matter experts at Navy Community Meeting Open House events. These events have allowed the Navy to steadily increase the number of community members it reaches in person over the past decade, including nearly 500 community members who attended Navy events in 2017 and 2018.

Members of HPNS distribution lists receive notice of upcoming Navy meetings. Navy presentations and other materials shared at meetings are posted on the Meeting Materials page of the HPNS website.

Site tours. The Navy offers guided bus tours of HPNS, providing participants with close-up views of the cleanup sites and the opportunity to ask questions in a small group environment. Tours are typically offered during the spring and summer each year and are open to the public. Send an email or leave a message on the HPNS Info Line at (415) 295-4742 to inquire about upcoming HPNS bus tours.

Radiological Technical Advisor. Dr. Kathryn Higley, an internationally recognized expert in radiological health and safety from Oregon State University, is available as an independent technical advisor to the greater Hunters Point community, specifically addressing radiological concerns. She welcomes questions by phone, email, in person at local events or by appointment.

Radiological Technical Advisor
Dr. Kathryn Higley
(571) 737-7063
kathryn.higley@oregonstate.edu

Tenant Outreach. The Navy offers targeted outreach and communicates site-specific updates to on-site tenants and/or tenant representatives to ensure accurate information is shared and tenant needs are addressed.

Information Line. The HPNS Info Line at (415) 295-4742 provides up-to-date information about outreach activities planned for the former Shipyard, including Navy meeting information and bus tour announcements and registration. The HPNS Info Line supports outgoing and incoming messages in English, Spanish and Cantonese.

Multilingual options. To support the diverse needs of the greater Hunters Point community, Cantonese and/or Spanish translators and translated print materials are available at identified local events and Navy Open House events, by mail to identified community groups and individuals upon request, and on the HPNS Info Line.

The HPNS Outreach Program provides many opportunities for the Navy to reach the community, share program information and receive input. While the current outreach channels have proven effective at reaching the community, the Navy regularly solicits the community’s input on its outreach and makes adjustments in response to community feedback and topics of interest. Continued feedback is welcome; if you have any questions or comments, please contact Derek Robinson at derek.j.robinson1@navy.mil.


October 30, 2019 

Ensuring the Protectiveness of Property Parcels Transferred to the City of San Francisco

Statement: In July 2019, the Navy released its latest Five-Year Review report for the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS), confirming that current and planned cleanup remedies at the site are protective of human health and the environment or will be when they are completed.  More specifically, the cleanup remedies are summarized as “Protective,” “Will Be Protective,” or “Short Term Protective.”  The selected categories depend on the current level of completeness of remedial actions and/or that certain components of the remedies are undergoing radiological retesting due to uncertainty caused by a previous contractor.  Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concurred with the Navy’s protectiveness determinations for HPNS.

The Navy will ensure cleanup remedies for all parcels remain protective over the long-term.  Generally, the “Will Be Protective” and “Short Term Protective” areas will undergo radiological retesting, including three parcels that were transferred to the City and County of San Francisco in 2015, Parcels D2, UC1 and UC2.

These parcels will be part of the radiological retesting effort that the Navy has committed to after it found that radiological survey work and remediation work done by one of its contractors was unreliable.

To ensure public safety, there are durable covers in place that prevent contact with the soil, along with appropriate land use controls.

What will happen next? In the coming months, as part of the retesting effort, the work plans for Parcels D2, UC1 and UC2 will be reviewed by regulatory agencies with the goal of finalizing work plans in the summer of 2020. Once plans are approved by regulators, the Navy will begin additional retesting work at these parcels to ensure the remedial actions remain protective for the long-term.  

 

August 13, 2019 
Facts About ‘Durable Covers’ and Protecting Public Health at Hunters Point

Statement: Public health and safety is the Navy’s first priority in the cleanup at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS). The Navy has worked extensively with federal, state regulators and city agencies to ensure the safe transfer of Hunters Point to the City of San Francisco. The Navy develops a specific work plan for every parcel at HPNS and each undergoes regulatory review.

The Navy has successfully remediated and transferred bases across the country, and leverages its expertise to design the most protective solutions for each individual facility, including Hunters Point. One solution used to protect public health from exposure to naturally occurring asbestos and metals in soil at Hunters Point is called a “durable cover.” Environmental engineers and scientists determine the correct type of cover – usually pavement or soil – and the cover’s thickness required to ensure public safety.

The use of durable covers was determined to be a suitable protective measure for most Hunters Point parcels. These determinations are consistent with the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) which defines the federal cleanup process. This process includes stakeholder input before such decisions are finalized.

At Hunters Point, durable cover solutions are currently in place at Parcels B, C, D-1, D-2, E, G, UC-1, UC-2, and UC-3 as permanent protective measures to ensure public safety by preventing exposure to naturally occurring asbestos and metals in soil. Information on the use of durable covers was shared with the public as part of CERCLA process over many years.

To ensure that the covers remain protective, the Navy monitors and maintains these covers through regular inspections of pavement conditions, cracks in building foundations, settlement, and accumulation of surface water, the condition of survey benchmarks and signs of vandalism. The durable cover protectiveness is also assessed as part of the ongoing Five-Year Review process required under CERCLA.

After property is transferred to civilian control, the City can develop the property in accordance with regulatory procedures and controls that take the durable covers into account. Additionally, the requirement to inspect and maintain the durable covers continues after property conveyance and development. 

More details and updates about the Navy’s cleanup work at Hunters Point are available at bracpmo.navy.mil/hpnsrc.

 

August 8, 2019 
Navy Releases Evaluation of Remedial Goals for Soil at Hunters Point, Opens Comment Period 

Statement:  The Five-Year Review report for the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS), released on August 6, recommended that the Navy evaluate the soil radiological remedial goals. Today, the Navy is releasing its evaluation for review and comment by stakeholders.

Under the Federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, remedial goals for each parcel at HPNS are set forth in the Records of Decision (RODs) for each CERCLA site.

The Navy evaluated the remedial goals for soil to ensure they are protective using its preferred method, RESRAD, as well as the PRG Calculator. These evaluations estimated the maximum radiation dose and the risk to residents from exposures to potentially contaminated Hunters Point soils. The Navy found that the radiological remedial goals for soils achieve the CERCLA protectiveness standard and are protective for future land uses. 

The evaluation of radiological remedial goals for soils is available at this link: Draft Evaluation of Soil Radiological Remedial Goals.

Any questions or comments should be submitted Mr. Derek Robinson, derek.j.robinson1@navy.mil.  

 

August 7, 2019 
Navy Releases Five-Year Review Report 

Statement:  On 31 July, the Navy released a Five-Year Review report for the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS). The review confirms that current and planned remedies at the site are, or will be at their completion, protective of human health and the environment. Recommendations in Section 7 indicate areas that the Navy will be evaluating in the near future as part of the Five-Year Review process.

The Five-Year Review is a standard and recurring process required under a federal law known as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. To prepare the report, the Navy evaluates documents, data, and stakeholder interview responses to assess whether the remedies selected for a site are functioning as intended and, most importantly, that they will continue to be protective of human health and the environment over the long term. The Navy has incorporated feedback from regulatory agencies and interested stakeholders.

The report indicates that many of the remedies are operating properly and successfully, including groundwater remediation, soil vapor extraction, use of durable covers, excavation and off-site soil disposal, and the application of land use controls.

This Five-Year Review Report also reiterates the Navy’s previous discovery and acknowledgement that data from a significant portion of the radiological survey and remediation work completed by Tetra Tech at HPNS was not reliable. The planned retesting of affected parcels will address these issues and enable further evaluation of the cleanup efforts.

This report follows the Navy’s 10 June release of its work plan for retesting Parcel G, an area the City of San Francisco has identified as a priority for redevelopment. The Navy is committed to working with its regulatory partners to complete the cleanup process; this will allow the transfer of property for productive reuse by the local community.

The Five Year Review report is available for viewing/download at the following link: Final Report.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact contact Mr. Derek Robinson, derek.j.robinson1@navy.mil.  

 

August 6, 2019 
Community Update About the Cleanup Work at Hunters Point

Statement: The Navy’s first priority in its Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) cleanup work at Hunters Point is community health and safety. Our commitment to ensuring the community has confidence in the safety of property transferred from Hunters Point to the City of San Francisco includes regular community outreach and updates.

Here is the latest summary of the Navy’s progress on cleanup and outreach efforts at Hunters Point:

  • Updated Community, Citizens Advisory Committee. BRAC’s environmental coordinator, Derek Robinson, presented the Navy’s plan for background soil sampling and path forward for Parcel G retesting at the April 22 Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) meeting. Since this meeting, the Navy has worked closely with regulatory agencies to address comments and finalize the Parcel G work plan.

    The Navy will be sharing its next update with the CAC on August 26, including the work that has now been approved: collecting and analyzing soil background samples at Parcel G.
  • Hosted Guided Tour of the Cleanup. On May 18, the Navy hosted a bus tour, offering community members and tenants a first-hand look at projects underway at Hunters Point. The Navy will continue hosting these events throughout the year. The next tour will be held on August 17. Email info@sfhpns.com for tour updates and reservations.

  • Finalized Parcel G Work Plan. The Navy on June 28 released its final work plan for retesting Parcel G, land identified by the City of San Francisco as a high priority for redevelopment. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approved the collection and analyses methods for soil background samples. This is an important first step in the overall process that will ensure reliable evaluation of the site. The Navy plans to initiate fieldwork in the next few weeks, and the public will be notified about the timeline accordingly.

  • CDPH Confirms Parcel A’s Safety. The California Department of Health (CDPH) has completed the health and safety scan of Parcel A-2, confirming there are no radiological health hazards on the site. CDPH detailed the information it collected and outlined in a final report issued on April 24. The survey covered all the areas of Parcel A-2 that were accessible to CDPH staff and the radiological anomalies detected were determined to be naturally occurring.

    CDPH also released its final report after surveying homes and art studios in Parcel A-1 to ensure there is no contamination. CDPH analyzed 229 dust swipes at 77 sites and found no evidence of radiological contamination.

    Additionally, a supplemental report indicates a follow-up scan at Parcel A-1 showed no trace of a previously reported low-energy peak, confirming there is no risk to public health and safety. The peak was identified in an inaccessible area of Parcel A-1 during a CDPH radiological survey in August 2018.
     
  • SFPD Building Passes Health Check. On July 25, the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH) issued a final report on the health and safety scan of Building 606 at Hunters Point, occupied by the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD). SFDPH conducted a series of health and safety assessments over the past year, and found no evidence of health hazards in Building 606 due to the Hunters Point cleanup. The testing was done to address employee concerns about indoor air quality, drinking water quality and characterization of soil for disposal.

    For more information on the Hunters Point cleanup: 
    Visit the Navy’s website at www.bracpmo.navy.mil/bracpmo 
    Call the HPNS Info Line at (415) 295-4742 
    Send an email to info@sfhpns.com

 

July 18, 2019 
Information about the Navy’s Radiological Oversight Program

Statement: After extensive consultations with EPA, the Navy has released its work plan for retesting Parcel G at the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. On June 20, the U.S. EPA approved a portion of the work plan, which details the collection and analyses methods for soil background samples.   

This project, like all radiological work at Hunters Point, includes significant fieldwork oversight and data/procedural quality assurance reviews. These actions are consistent with the standard radiological monitoring program in place at Hunters Point since 2016.

Highlights of the process include:

  • Radiological expert review of plans and results
  • Program management oversight of all project aspects
  • Onsite fieldwork monitoring conducted by the Navy Resident Officer in Charge of Construction
  • Third‐party contractor provides oversight of process documentation, onsite activities and quality assurance checks of fieldwork 
  • Oversight of activities and review of data/reports by federal and state regulators, including split sampling 


Since January 2016, the Navy’s third-party quality assurance contractor has conducted over 780 radiological inspections on 18 projects over six contractors. Typical activities observed include instrument function testing, radiation surveys, portal monitor operations and soil sampling.

The quality assurance contractor works closely with fieldwork contractors to ensure project objectives are met. Optimization opportunities and/or corrective actions are immediately conveyed to the fieldwork contractor and the Navy to determine the best course of action.   

For more information on the Navy’s quality assurance process, contact Mr. Derek Robinson, derek.j.robinson1@navy.mil.  

 

June 21, 2019 (updated 7-3-19)
Navy Releases Hunters Point Parcel G Work Plan

Statement: After extensive consultations with EPA, the Navy has released its work plan for retesting Parcel G at the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. On June 20, the U.S. EPA approved a portion of the work plan, which details the collection and analyses methods for soil background samples. This is an important first step in the overall process that will ensure reliable evaluation of the site. The Navy plans to initiate this fieldwork in the next few weeks.

Over the next few months, the Navy will continue to work with the regulatory agencies regarding the rest of the work plan to begin the radiological retesting on Parcel G. Retesting will determine whether site conditions at Parcel G meet original cleanup objectives, ensuring the property is suitable for transfer to the City of San Francisco, or if additional excavation and sampling are required. The City has identified this property as a high-priority parcel for redevelopment. 

Under its Parcel G work plan, the Navy will reevaluate areas where Tetra Tech EC did radiological work, which includes scanning and analyzing about 20,000 square meters of building surface areas and 6,900 soil samples. The retesting work will include multiple layers of Navy and regulatory agency oversight and an independent third-party contractor to monitor daily site operations.

The Navy remains confident in the design of its cleanup program and is committed to the safe cleanup and transfer of Hunters Point to the City of San Francisco.

Community input should be sent to Mr. Derek Robinson, derek.j.robinson1@navy.mil.  

 

April 29, 2019
Update regarding the finalization of Navy’s Hunters Point Five Year Review and Parcel G work plan

Statement:  The Navy is working with the Environmental Protection Agency to finalize its Five Year Review and Parcel G work plan for Hunters Point.

The focus of the collaboration with the EPA is to ensure the Parcel G work plan provides credible data about site conditions and to verify remediation efforts have met clean-up goals. The effort also includes analyzing program impacts from the Tetra Tech data falsification. Once work plan details are finalized the re-evaluation of this site will move forward. 

The Navy has proposed the use of RESRAD as part of the Hunters Point cleanup.  RESRAD is a regulatory tool developed by Argonne National Lab and is the Navy and environmental clean-up industry’s most trusted tool for determining radiological risk. It has been used for decades by the Navy BRAC program, U.S. Department of Defense, and the U.S. Department of Energy for radiological clean-up programs nationwide. The Navy believes it is the right tool to ensure the cleanup is completed properly at Hunters Point.

The Navy also sent a letter on 15 March to regulatory agencies about its intent to use RESRAD over the PRG calculator.

DOE and Argonne National Laboratory studies highlight the benefits RESRAD over other tools such as the Preliminary Remedial Goal (PRG) Calculator that was developed for use as a screening tool; however, the Navy will continue to work with the EPA on using the PRG Calculator at Hunters Point to complement the RESRAD tool.

Once the EPA approves the Navy’s updates to the Hunters Point work plan, the Navy is ready to begin radiological retesting of Hunters Point. 

 

April 25, 2019
Navy Statement on CDPH Final Report Verifying Parcel A2 Safety

Statement:  The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) has released its final report on the radiological health and safety survey of Parcel A-2, click here. The report confirms that Parcel A-2 is safe. The Navy appreciates CDPH’s partnership in performing this important and detailed work.

 

April 23, 2019
This is the first in a series of community updates about the clean-up work at Hunters Point

Statement:  The Navy's first priority in its Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) clean-up work at Hunters Point is community health and safety. To ensure residents and all interested parties can feel confident about the path forward for Hunters Point, the Navy is committed to providing access to timely, factual information. READ MORE>.

 

December 6, 2018
Navy's perspective on the completion of radiological scans for Parcel A-1

Statement:  The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) surface scans of Parcel A-1 were completed on October 26, 2018, and the information collected confirms that the area was not used for work involving radiological materials.  The scan did not find any soil contamination or evidence of radiological activities.

Most importantly, the scan's extremely detailed and sensitive methodology reinforced the fact that Parcel A is safe. The lone historical Navy object found was a naval deck marker, which was buried under approximately 10 inches of soil, at the bottom of the hill on the north side of Parcel A-1, in an undeveloped and fenced area. This deck marker would not have resulted in a health or safety hazard to anyone who happened to be at  that spot previously. The Navy appreciates that CDPH undertook this effort.  

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October 31, 2018 (enhanced Nov. 21, 2018)
 Navy response about external report on Hunters Point Naval Shipyard Cleanup Standards

Statement:  The Navy's first priority in its Base Realignment and Closure cleanup work at Hunters Point is human health and safety. We stand by our existing clean-up goals at Hunters Point, which (are some of the most conservative in the BRAC program and) have in the past been confirmed by expert review across multiple regulatory agencies to be protective of human health.  While different methodologies can be used to calculate goals and risk, the Navy has consistently evaluated EPA risk criteria, leveraged their expert guidance in our calculations, and we work together toward the same goal of ensuring that the property is suitable for transfer and reuse by the City of San Francisco.

As part of the 5-year review process, the Navy evaluates past remedial actions to determine if they remain protective.  Consistent with regulatory agency and public comments on the July 9 draft 2018 5-Year Review, using current risk assessment procedures and guidance, the Navy evaluated the protectiveness of past remedial action levels and will present Navy draft calculations in the 2018 5-year Review.  The next version is expected to be distributed to the public and regulators for further review in November 2018. The referenced EPA comments were accepted by the Navy and the EPA's Preliminary Remediation Goal (PRG) calculator was used to evaluate protectiveness of Navy remedial goals.

 

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October 30, 2018
Navy response about external reports questioning validity of the HPNS Historical Radiological Assessment.

Statement: The Navy's Historical Radiological Assessment (HRA) covers 64 years of radiological history from 1939 to 2003 at the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPNS) and is based on expert analysis by the Navy of thousands of historical records and over 150 interviews with people who worked at HPNS. The HRA was prepared by the Navy and was reviewed with applicable State and Federal regulators, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, California Department of Public Health, California Department of Toxic Substances and Control, San Francisco Department of Public Health, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Recent reports from outside groups on the quality of the HRA do not provide any new factual evidence to challenge the conclusions of the HRA. 

The Navy has full confidence in the HRA for Hunters Point as being an accurate and reliable evaluation of impacted radiological sites that have been or are slated for cleanup to ensure the property is suitable for transfer to the City of San Francisco and protective of public health. 

Details about the radiological cleanup of HPNS, including the HRA, are available at: bracpmo.navy.mil/hpnsrc.

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October 10, 2018
Navy response to claims about the radiological cleanup at Hunters Point

Statement: on March 16, 2018, the representative for a former Tetra Tech EC employee contacted EPA Region 9 about claims regarding the radiological cleanup program at Hunters Point. Representatives of the Navy and EPA met with the two parties on May 17, 2018 to visit the site and document their statements. Thereafter, the Navy reviewed the information and developed responses for each claim as follows.  

C1: The concentration of Radium-226, from samples collected at Parcel A, are above the Soil Cleanup Levels according to lab reports provided by the reporting parties.  

R1: The Navy has reviewed these lab reports and determined the Radium-226 concentrations are consistent with ordinary brick and concrete samples. 

C2: Four keel blocks (previously used at Hunters Point) have been placed near the Lennar Welcome Center at Parcel A as landscaping accents. Keel blocks were considered rad-impacted or potentially contaminated because they may have been used during decontamination of Operation Crossroads naval vessels in dry docks. 

R2: The keel blocks were scanned and released as safe. The Navy allowed Lennar to use the keel blocks because they represent shipyard history. They have been rescanned and affirmed safe as part of the radiological health and safety scan being conducted at Parcel A by the California Department of Public Health. 

C3: A former worker claimed that a soil sample collected near the corner of Fisher and Spear Streets was analyzed and had a Cs-137 concentration of about 3 picocuries per gram (pCi/g), which was well above the cleanup level being used (0.113 pCi/g). 

R3: The area identified is located on Parcel UC-1. It will be thoroughly evaluated using soil borings as part of the retesting of the UC Parcels. Soil samples will be collected at the surface and at intervals likely down to shallow bedrock. Additionally, as part of the chemical remediation efforts in 2012, after the claimed soil sample was collected, the Navy removed the surface soil and replaced it with clean import fill. 

C4: The Reporting party indicated observing a dump truck carrying wet soil in February 2018 from Parcel E to a soil stockpile being used by the developer (FivePoint) on Parcel A. 

R4: In February 2018, Parcel E-2 (not Parcel E) soil activities were being conducted by the Navy’s Parcel E-2 contractor. The Navy’s contractor was questioned and has indicated that all soil is being reused onsite as a foundation layer for Parcel E-2 and that soil has not been transported to Parcel A. The Navy’s independent 3rd party oversight contractor has verified that soil did not leave Parcel E-2.  

Note: Claim (C) and Navy Responses (R) 

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October 3, 2018
Navy to conduct comprehensive surface scan on Parcel G, previously transferred parcels.

Statement: The Navy is committed to ensuring the City of San Francisco and the community have confidence in the safety of land transferred from Hunters Point to the City of San Francisco.  In addition to re-evaluating areas where Tetra Tech EC did radiological work as part of the current draft Parcel G Work Plan, the Navy will also be completing a health and safety scan of all accessible areas of Parcel G after the re-testing work is complete and prior to transfer to the City of San Francisco. Similarly, Navy will perform health and safety scans of the surface of Parcels D-2, UC-1, and UC-2 after the reevaluation of Tetra Tech EC's work on those parcels is complete to provide confidence in their suitability for reuse by the City.
 

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September 19, 2018
Where Can I Find Information About the Deck Marker that was Detected and Removed from Parcel A-1?

Statement: The Navy has prepared and posted questions and answers (Q&A) at the following link: Q&A

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September 13, 2018 (updated 9-20-18)
Update on Parcel A scanning 

Statement:  After completing about 90% of scanning activities on Parcel A-1, information collected continues to confirm that area is safe. California Department of Public Health technicians have identified and investigated anomalous readings at twenty eight locations. Twenty seven of the anomalous readings were determined to be caused by naturally occurring radiological constituents found in landscaping materials, such as wood chips and fertilizer. 

One anomalous reading was identified as a historical, low-level deck marker and removed by the Navy. The 1.5 inch deck marker was found approximately 10 inches below the surface and did not pose a risk to people living or working at Hunters Point. The deck marker was located just west of the Department of Public Works trailer, at the bottom of the hill on the north side of parcel A-1, in an undeveloped area behind a fence. Deck markers were typically used to illuminate ship pathways and are similar to the personnel markers clipped to a belt or helmet to enable sailors operating under darkened conditions to identify each other's positions.

California Department of Public Health officials are close to completing scanning of Parcel A and information collected continues to reinforce that the site is safe. For regular updates of California Department of Public Health activities, please see their website at: 
 
https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CEH/DRSEM/Pages/RHB-Environment/Hunters-Point-Naval-Shipyard-Parcel-A-1-Survey.aspx/#  

Related photo links: 1) Deck Marker, 2) Approx. Location

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August 17, 2018
Comments regarding the Draft Work Plan for Retesting Parcel G.

Statement: As part of our efforts to include community and regulatory stakeholder input in developing the path forward for Hunters Point, the Navy is pleased to have received comments on the Draft Work Plan for Retesting Parcel G. Data collected will be used to determine whether the site conditions at Parcel G meet original cleanup objectives and the land is suitable for transfer to the city, or if additional work (including excavation and sampling) is required.

The Navy is committed to conducting 100% of needed remediation if remaining contamination is found.

The Navy will be evaluating the comments received and, as appropriate, incorporate them into a Draft Final Work Plan. The Navy and regulatory agencies will then work together to ensure that the Draft Final Work Plan is legally and technically complete, and initiate the Parcel G retesting program. The Navy appreciates all community and regulatory input on its documents and looks forward to finalizing the Work Plan to enable data gathering at Parcel G as soon as possible.

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August 14, 2018
Information about the drinking water system at Building 606.

Statement: Potable water at Hunters Point is supplied by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission and has been confirmed by the San Francisco Department of Public Health as being safe for consumption. If not used, water can sit in pipes for an extended amount of time potentially resulting in discoloration and a higher mineral content which could affect the taste.  

Also, when water sits idle in older distribution systems that used copper pipes and lead-based solder, it is possible that these metals could slowly dissolve into the water to levels that exceed drinking water standards. As a preventative measure, EPA recommends cycling water through the pipes, at the tap, for a short period to flush the system.

In February 1997, the San Francisco Police Department began moving into Building 606. On March 6, 1997, an industrial hygienist sampled water at Building 606 and determined that the water was safe to drink (the report with this information was completed on March 24, 1997). A total of nine water sampling events took place between March 1997 and Sept 1999 at Building 606, all found that the water was safe to drink.

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August 1, 2018
Navy response to media queries regarding Rep. Pelosi’s July 27, 2018 press release at: https://www.democraticleader.gov/newsroom/72718/

Statement:  "The Office of the Naval Inspector General received Rep. Pelosi's letter and will respond in an appropriate time and manner to address the concerns she presented.  It would be inappropriate to comment on this matter any further at this time.  Throughout the Hunters Point cleanup and transfer process, the Navy has adhered to regulatory cleanup standards established by the USEPA and other public agencies, following principles that are protective of the public.  Transparency in the cleanup and re-testing process at Hunters Point is a goal Navy shares with Rep. Pelosi to ensure the property is suitable for transfer and the public is protected," said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan de Vera, U.S. Navy spokesman.   

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July 31, 2018 
Representative Nancy Pelosi was briefed by the Navy Base Realignment and Closure Office and involved regulatory agencies about progress with the radiological clean-up program at Hunters Point.

Statement:  The following files were shared during the brief: 1) HPNS Radiological ReevaluationH2) HPNS Figures, and 3) HPNS photo. 

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July 3, 2018 
How will the Navy proceed with awarding a contract to retest Parcel G and what contractors are involved? How is Jacobs Engineering involved and how much is the Navy's existing contract?

Statement:  The current contract with Jacobs Engineering totals $8.75 million. Work already completed under this contract includes research that identified potential data manipulation and enabled the Navy to prepare Finding Reports for suspect Buildings and Soil. This contract will also be used to reevaluate all Parcel G buildings identified in our retesting work plan--details are being finalized.

A new contractor to conduct radiological surveys for the re-evaluation of soil at Parcel G will be selected from a list of five additional contractors that are qualified to perform this work.

The five contractors being solicited for a bid include: 1) Gilbane Federal Services, 2) AECOM-Energy Solutions JB (Joint Venture), 3) AMEC Foster Wheeler Environmental & Infrastructure, 4) APTIM Federal Services (formerly known as CB&I Federal Services LLC), and 5) EDD Insight Philotechnics. The Navy has worked with each of the five contractors and Jacobs Engineering in the past. 

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June 15, 2018 
The Navy has prepared a work plan for radiological retesting at Parcel G on HPNS which is available for public comment during a 60-day period beginning June 15, 2018.

Statement:  The Navy will collect new data at sites where TtEC had previously gathered radiological data. Cleanup objectives for each parcel were developed early in the Superfund process to prevent exposure to possible radiological contamination in existing soil and buildings, as documented in the Record of Decision (ROD). The rework to collect new data will begin with Parcel G. This new data, including results from soil and buildings that remain at the areas in question, will verify if the property is suitable for transfer.  If the new data does not verify the property is suitable for transfer, subsequent work plans will be developed for any additional work and next steps. The public is encouraged to review and comment on the Parcel G work plan (link below) during the 60-day public comment period (June 15, 2018 - August 14, 2018). Written comments to the work plan may submitted to derek.j.robinson1@navy.mil

The following links are for related documents to parcel G retesting: 1)
draft work plan, 2) fact sheet, 3) press release, and 4) Q&As.

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May 16, 2018
The Navy received a letter dtd 14 May from the Mayor of San Francisco regarding safety concerns at the Hunters Point Shipyard.

Statement:  We are in receipt of a letter from Mayor Farrell and appreciate the chance to respond to his questions regarding the Navy's work at Hunters Point Shipyard. For many years, the Navy has worked closely with EPA, California Department of Public Health and Department of Toxic Substances Control to achieve our common goal of environmental cleanup that is protective of human health and the environment.  As we reinforced at Monday's Board of Supervisors hearing, the Navy and EPA have confirmed that the Hunters Point Shipyard and areas surrounding the site are safe.

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May 14, 2018
2018 Navy Statement to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.

Statement:  An Informational briefing was provided by the Base Realignment and Closure, Program Management Office Director regarding the Hunters Point Shipyard radiological cleanup program.  

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May 9, 2018
On 9 May Tetra Tech released information indicating that the Navy has shown interest in their proposal to pay for an independent party to retest for radiological contamination at the Hunters Point Shipyard.

Statement:  Independent retesting is a critical element of the Navy's Hunters Point reevaluation workplan.  We believe it to be necessary to provide a comprehensive, credible data set to reassure the community about their safety as well as determine the extent of any remediation activities needed to complete the cleanup of HPNS. Tetra Tech has made a broad public offer to pay for retesting; the Navy requires a more concrete and specific proposal to evaluate the appropriateness of their offer. The safety of the HPNS residents is the Navy's highest priority, so the retesting must be carried out to the highest standard by a READ MORE>.

 


 

May 2, 2018
Navy's response to Tetra Tech's announcement that it will pay for an independent party to retest for radiological contamination at the Hunters Point Shipyard?

Statement:  Independent retesting is a critical element of the Navy's Hunters Point reevaluation workplan. Its purpose is not to exonerate the contractors involved, but to offer a comprehensive, credible data set to reassure the community about their safety, determine the extent of any remediation activities needed, and complete the cleanup of HPNS. We are in receipt of a letter from Tetra Tech and will be evaluating the appropriate course of action to support the success of the Hunters Point cleanup program and ensure the safety of the Hunters Point community.

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May 2, 2018 
An EPA Memo, dated 29 Dec. 2017, provided an evaluation of findings reports for Parcels B & G that found a higher percentage of data concerns than the Navy.

 

Statement: There is no fundamental disagreement between Navy and EPA regulators.While the analysis approach and numbers may differ, the cumulative assessments have led us to evaluate the most efficient retesting approach to ensure the property is safe for transfer to the local community.The Navy and regulatory agencies agree that all Tetra Tech radiological work areas need to be retested.  Percentages reported by the Navy in our technical evaluations represent areas where data has indications of potential falsification only. The percentages reported in the December 27, 2017 EPA letter indicate READ MORE>.

 

 

 

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